Monday, 12 November 2012

Structured Furniture and Interiors Show Some Spine

Just like fashion likes to dabble with the concept of underwear as outerwear, architects and furniture designers are showing off clever construction techniques.

From flat-packed furniture that slots together to amazing framework forms in chairs and tables, structural aesthetics in furniture and interior design is a winning trend.

Just last Friday, March Studio was nominated the stand-out winner of the retail category at the Australian Interior Design Excellence Awards 2012 for the design of the sinuous and skeletal interior of the bakery store Baker D Chirico in Carlton, Melbourne. Plywood joinery never looked so high brow.

1. Architect Amanda Levete of AL_A produced a three-storey high Timber Wave sculpture, which was installed outside the V&A museum in London for the London Design Festival 2011; via amandalevetearchitects.com
2.Vederlicht lamp from Studio Daniel 2012, via danielhulsbergen.com
3. D23 Skeleton chair by Berlin-based designer Gustav Duesing is assembled from birch ply; via gustav-duesing.com
4. Jack's Table is an early piece from Sydney-based studio Fereday; via tomfereday.com
5. March Studio won the IDEA 2012 retail category award with this bakery in Carlton, Melbourne; Photographer: Peter Bennetts; via marchstudio.com.au
6. Rental space at Droog; via droog.com
7. This Sofa XXXX is another concertinaed form by-yuya-ushida; yuyavsdesign.com
The designer says: "Whenever I see it the beauty of the simple geometrical structure and its repetition always fascinates me."



LAVA’s design for the Martian Embassy is for The Sydney Story Factory, a not-for-profit creative writing centre for young people in Redfern, Sydney; via l-a-v-a.net
The assemble yourself 2-3 JUNIOR CHAIR from CK Goff and Yellow Diva.
Yellow Diva is a Melbourne-based design practice which entered this chair in the Object category of the Australian Interior design Excellence Awards 2012; via idea-awards.com.au and yellowdiva.com
Swedish designer Pål Rodenius has come up with a novel idea of pre-printed plywood patterns which when cut out create a whole suite of furniture. It's appropriately named Saw and Assemble; via rodenius.se

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